Looking Back at 2019

2019 was a fruitful year for Kua`aina Associates. We produced Ancestral Ink: A Symposium Honoring Indigenous Tattoo Traditions during the week of the 98th Annual Santa Fe Indian Market and hosted  Ancestral Ink San Francisco Community Forum: Indigenous Women and Tattoo Practices at the Main Library.  Kua`aina’s director, Carolyn Kuali`i was the guest curator for the exhibit, The Continuous Thread: Celebrating Our Interwoven Histories, Identities and Contributions, which was the official kink off for the San Francisco Arts Commission’s American Indian Initiative. The exhibit coincided with the 50th Anniversary of the Occupation of Alcatraz, the one-year anniversary of the City’s first Indigenous People’s Day and the anniversary of the removal of the Early Days sculpture. Kua`aina’s Board of Directors are grateful to the funders and individual contributors that supported our work and helped celebrate the excellence of Indigenous cultures and art. 

The following is a preview of these three programs. Enjoy!!

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A special acknowledgement and gratitude to the Tewa people for welcoming Ancestral Ink onto their beautiful ancestral land.

August 2019: Ancestral Ink: A Symposium Honoring Indigenous Tattoo Traditions brought together Indigenous tattoo practitioners and cultural bearers from the Pacific and North America who are the forerunners in the revival of traditional cultural practices, providing an informative, engaging and inspiring forum that celebrates the resurgence and resilience of Indigenous peoples and traditional tattooing practices. 

Ancestral Ink was produced collaboratively by Kua’aina Associates and Broken Boxes Podcast , and was hosted on the campus of the Santa Fe Art Institute in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Symposium Presenters / Tattoo Practitioners

Sulu`ape Keone Nunes (Native Hawaiian), Master Tattoo Practitioner
Te Rangitu Netana (Nagpuhi, Ngati Wai & Te Arawa tribes of Aotearoa)
Marjorie Tahbone (Inupiaq from Nome, Alaska)
Dion Kaszas (Nlaka`pamux), co-founders of the EarthLine Tattoo School on the University of British Columbia’s Okanagan campus situated on the territory of the Syilz Okanagan Nation. 

The symposium also featured a panel of California Indian cultural bearers who have been part of the renewal and reawakening of their tattoo traditions including Loren Bommelyn (Tolowa Dee-ni’), Lena Bommelyn (Karuk), L Frank Manriquez (Tongva-Acjachemen), Sage La Peña (NomtipomWintu) and Tiffany Adams (Chemehuevi, Konkow Maidu).  

Symposium Programming 

• Critical discourse around Indigenous tattooing practices
• Video shorts from the documentary series “Skindigenous” that explore indigenous tattooing traditions around the world
• An open-studio experience to provide attendees an opportunity to interact with the practitioners and panelists, and witness traditional tattoo demonstrations 

Topics 

  • The different regional tattooing traditions, methods and designs 
  • Cultural protocols associated with tattooing
  • Personal responsibility in receiving a tattoo
  • Issues around cultural appropriation 
  • Importance of safe tattooing practices – health and safety 

Ancestral Ink has been made possible by the generous support of the The Native Arts & Cultures Foundation, Honor the Earth, The Cultural Conservancy, American Indian Cultural Center of San Francisco, Meow Wolf and AHA Festival of Progressive Arts

Check it out: Ancestral Ink Printed Program

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Help us as we continue to support the Excellence of Indigenous Cultures and the Arts.  Your donation is tax deductible.   Donate LinkKua'ainaOptima.jpg

Kua`aina Associates, Inc. is an indigenous arts and cultures non-profit dedicated to upholding the integrity of indigenous peoples and their desire to preserve the wisdom of their ancestors through traditional and contemporary arts as a contribution for the betterment of their people and the global community. kuaainaassociates.com    kuaainaassociates@gmail.com

 

November 9, 2019 – Ancestral Ink San Francisco Community Forum

Indigenous Women and Tattoo Practices

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In collaboration with the American Indian Cultural Center and the Friends of the San Francisco Library, Kua`aina hosted Indigenous Women and Tattoo Practices at the San Francisco Main Library on November 9, 2019. The forum was support by grant funds from the San Francisco Arts Commission.  The forum allowed Kua`aina to bring a greater awareness to the cultural importance and practice of traditional tattooing among indigenous women. Among the presenters was a panel of Native California Indian women who has been part of the renewal and reawakening of their community’s tattoo traditions –  L Frank Manriquez, Sage LaPena, Tiffany Adams and Heidi Harper Lucero. Filipina artist and San Francisco Bay Area muralist, Cece Carpio was also a panelist.  Ms Carpio had the privilege of visiting Northern Philippines, which continues to have a strong tradition of women tattoo practitioners. Cece received her tattoos by the Wang Od Oggay’s niece – Whang Od is considered the last and oldest practitioner of Kalinga tattooing in the region.

The San Francisco Community Forum provided a safe space where Natives were able to ask personal questions and receive valuable feedback. For example, during a Q&A, a young California Indian woman mentioned how she would like to get her chin tattoo but not sure it would go over well in her workplace. The decision to wear a chin tattoo is very personal and it was powerful for this young woman to hear the stories of the women on the panel who spoke of their experience in relationship to her question.

These kinds of interactions and experiences is the result of programming Kua`aina support and host. Our commitment to our mission has proven that we are providing a service that is greatly needed. We will continue to document the impact and how communities are benefiting through media documentation, interviews, surveys and engagement.

 

October 4 – December 14, 2019 at the San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery

The Continuous Thread: Celebrating Our Interwoven Histories, Identities and Contributions

The Continuous Thread was exhibited on the unceded land of the Ramaytush Ohlone, neighbored by the Muwekma Ohlone, Costanoan-Esselen, Rumsen, Mutsun and the Confederated Villages of the Lisjan Ohlone Peoples. We acknowledge their elders, both past and present, as well as future generations. We thank the Ohlone Peoples for their support of “The Continuous Thread” exhibit.  This acknowledgement demonstrates a commitment to the process of working to dismantle the ongoing legacies of settler colonialism and the disregard of the original peoples of this place we call San Francisco.

Featuring the photographic works of: Hulleah J. Tsinhnahjinnie  – Taskigi and Diné, Britt Bradley – Algonquin, Hispanic and Irish American descent and Jean Melesaine – Samoan

Curated by Carolyn Melenani Kuali`i  – Native Hawaiian and Mescalero

This photographic exhibit was part of the San Francisco Art Commission’s Early Days photo project, that took place on April 5 and 6, 2019.  Over 150 members of the San Francisco Bay Area indigenous community came together to be photographed on the empty plinth where once stood the offensive Early Days statue, a component of the Pioneer Monument.

The Continuous Thread celebrated the indigeneity of the San Francisco Bay Area Native community. The photographs brought light to the rich tribal and cultural diversity,  contributions of the members of the SF Bay Area community, and their “Native Truth” that is rooted in countering discrimination, invisibility and false narratives.  During the photo shoot, the community stood together to honor the courageous ones who came before them, and to acknowledge the historical narrative and circumstances that led them to be part of the American Indian Urban Experience.

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Meet the team behind the de Young Global Fellow, Douglas Miles

Aloha kakou….It is Kua`aina Associates’ belief that working collaboratively on a project provides an opportunity for a more monumental outcome.  As an organization who produces and coordinates art and cultural projects and programs, it’s especially magical when we have the opportunity to work with art organizations and their staff  that are like-minded and committed to the maintenance and sharing of culture and artistic expression. The partners of the de Young’s 2016-17 Global Fellows Project are no exception. It’s been a pleasure to work side by side with these amazing colleagues as we prepare for Douglas Miles’ arrival to San Francisco. These passionate visionaries, who are hard working individuals, believe that art is a vehicle in creating a beautiful and better world. We the team behind the scene are truly blessed to be in a position to  do this work – to share ideas, resources, skills and friendships, while being in the midst of creative geniuses.

Join us by celebrating the excellence of art and culture by visiting Douglas Miles:

  • Feb. 1 – 26: Artist-in-Resident, Kimball Education Gallery at the de Young Museum
  • March 1 – 13:  Public Art at the Luggage Store’s 509 Ellis, Tenderloin National Forest

E hana me ka ha ` aha` a,  Carolyn Kuali`i

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Carolyn Kualii – Kua`aina  Co-Founder/Director;  Laurie Lazer – The Luggage Store Co-Founder/Director/Curator;  Rene Baldocchi – Art Consultant & former Director of Public Programs, de Young Museum and Kevin Chen – Manager of Artist Studio & Public Programs de Young Museum

The de Young Global Fellows program invites indigenous artists from around the world to activate the museum as a space where important cultural connections can be forged and historic collections can be enlivened through the interactions with the public. Art, indigenous knowledge, and technology will be brought together to interrogate and explore the relationship of our global community to our shared natural environment.

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de Young Global Fellow, Douglas Miles’  “Fort Apache” mural in South Bronx in collaboration with Point CDC 2016   “There is a place in AZ called Fort Apache and there is a place in the South Bronx, NY called the same”.

Throughout each year, the selected artist will share process as they develop their work and educate local, national, and international audiences about the environmental issues facing indigenous communities. They will also utilize their artwork to protect and maintain the cultural heritage of their communities. For one month, the artist takes up residence at the de Young museum to share their works and works-in-progress, promoting cross-cultural exchange and dialogue and to engage in biocultural education and expression.

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Kimball Education Gallery – Global Fellow    Douglas Mile Artist-in-Residency                Feb. 1 to Feb. 26, 2017   Tuesday – Sundays 1pm – 5pm

The Collaborative Team Behind the Scene:

screen-shot-2017-01-13-at-11-57-59-amThe Luggage Store, also known as The 509 Cultural Center is a non profit artist run multidisciplinary arts organization, founded in 1987. The Luggage Store builds community by organizing multidisciplinary arts programming accessible to and reflective of the Bay Area’s residents. Programs are designed to broaden social and aesthetic networks, and to encourage the flow of images and ideas between the diverse cultural communities that cross paths in our exceptionally dynamic downtown San Francisco neighborhood.

 The Luggage Store organize exhibitions, performing arts events, arts education and public art programs designed to amplify the voices of the region’s diverse artists and residents, to promote inclusion and respect, to reduce inter-group tensions and to work towards dispelling the stereotypes and fears that continue to separate us. http://www.luggagestoregallery.org

logoKua`aina Associates was established in 2002 as a result of a Hawaiian and Maori recognizing that it was time and their responsibility to bring together their collective years of experience as cultural stewards. Kua`aina is a non-profit organization that provides capacity building assistance to Native cultural and art organizations, cultural masters, individual artists and produces special art and cultural projects. http://kuaainaassociates.com

“Kua`aina takes into their care what is precious and scared to indigenous peoples and facilitate the passing of indigenous knowledge and cultural values from one generation to another”.  

 The de Young Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco was founded in 1895 in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park and has been an integral part of the cultural fabric of the city and a cherished destination for million of residents and visitors tot he region for over 100 years. In 2005, the de Young Museum re-opened in a state-of-the-art new facility that integrates are, architecture and the natural landscape in one multi-faceted destination that inspire audiences from around the world.

Designed by the renowned Swiss architecture firm Herzog & de Neuron and Fong & Chan Architects in San Francisco. The New de Young provides San Francisco with a landmark art museum to showcase the museum’s priceless collections of American art from the 17th through the 20th centuries, Textile arts, and art of Africa, Oceania, and the Americans.

About Our Funder:  The de Young Global Fellows are supported through the generosity of Christian Fund  who believes in the power of biological and cultural diversity to sustain and enrich a world faced with great change and uncertainty. The Foundation focus on the biocultural – the rich but neglected adaptive interweave of people and place, culture and ecology. https://www.christensenfund.org

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Christensen Fund’s mission is to buttress the efforts of people and institutions who believe in a biodiverse world infused with artistic expression and work to secure ways of life and landscapes that are beautiful, bountiful and resilient.

 

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“APACHELYPSE Now” Douglas Miles: de Young Museum’s 2016-17 Global Fellow

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“APACHELYPSE Now” a glimpse into the multi-faceted work of Douglas Miles from the San Carlos Apache Nation in Arizona. Using street art forms, he creates work that simultaneously deconstructs stereotypes and emboldens Native people in the 21st century. Douglas’ renegade ethos at work creates a new iconography in art, photos and film. The title, “APACHELYPSE Now” is an homage to Francis Ford Coppola’s Vietnam epic “Apocalypse Now” about a lone poet, renegade colonel, and his tribe gone rogue from the U.S.

Douglas Miles is an artist, designer, photographer, filmmaker, muralist, public speaker and founder of Apache Skateboards. He assembles traditional and non-traditional materials and images to tell American Indian stories and to offer Native perspectives often absent from mainstream accounts. His work encourages reflection on how art can foster community-building and promote pride and well-being, especially among young people. His use of imagery that includes the famous Apache Chief Geronimo emphasizes both the centrality of conflict in Apache-American modern history, as well as the Native resistance to both cultural commodification and political incorporation. His work is rooted in Apache history and deeply engaged with the world of contemporary pop culture.

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“Apache Leadership” – 8′ x 5″ – Aerosol on canvas portrait of legendary Apache Chief Geronimo           Painted by Douglas Miles @ San Carlos Apache Nation 2016

Douglas’ work has been exhibited at Princeton University, Columbia University, the Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History, and the Institute of American Indian Arts Museum in Santa Fe, to name a few. His work is in the collections of the National Museum of the American Indian, the Montclair Art Museum, the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art, Warner Brothers Studios, and the Eddie Basha Collection. Douglas recently collaborated with actor and author Ethan Hawke and artist Greg Ruth on a New York Times bestseller graphic novel, Indeh: A Story of the Apache Wars.

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Douglas Miles, Doug Jr & Ethan Hawks – photo shot by Ernie Paniccioli

Apache Skateboards: Watching his son practice skateboarding in the early 2000s, Miles drew corollaries between skateboarding and the Apache warrior tradition, as both involved increased concentration, stamina, and the ability to withstand pain. After finding no skate decks available relevant to Apache culture, Miles painted a skateboard deck himself and gave it to his son, spawning Apache Skateboards and Apache Skate Team.

14225336_10155250176643378_5929044320439892158_n.jpgApache Skateboards, comprised of Miles and a number of younger collaborators including his son Douglas Jr. and photographer/filmmaker Reuben Ringlero, work in film, photography, fine art, skateboarding, murals, multimedia projects, community projects, skate park planning, skateboard events, apparel design, television, film, youth conferences, and speaking engagements. As Apache Skate Team, the group gives skating demonstrations, organizes skateboard contests and concerts, and curates art shows around the country, especially on Indian Reservations.

Douglas Miles’ San Francisco Visit:  As the 2016-17 de Young Global Fellow, Douglas will be in San Francisco from January 17 – March 14, 2017. During his visit,  he will engage with the Bay Area indigenous and artistic communities, including a month long artist-in-residency at the de Young Musuem. In March, Douglas will be a guest artist of the Luggage Store Gallery in downtown San Francisco, where he will create a public art piece at the Luggage Store Annex/509 Cultural Center. The 509 Cultural Center is one of San Francisco’s premier non profit multidisciplinary arts organizations dedicated to cultural equity and broadening social and aesthetic networks.

  • January 17 – March 15: Douglas Miles will connect and engage with the San Francisco Bay Area’s indigenous and artistic communities.
  • February 1 – 26: “Apachelypse Now”- Douglas Miles, de Young Museum’s Artist-in-Residence,  Kimball Education Gallery, Wednesdays – Sundays, 1 – 5pm
  • February 25 from 3pm – 5pm: Closing reception, Kimball Education Gallery
  • March 1 – March 13: Public Art project at 509 Ellis, Tenderloin National Forest in partnership with the Luggage Store Gallery located in downtown San Francisco
  • March 1 – March 13: Public Viewing of public art work at 509 Ellis

The Global Fellows Program is made possible with the generous support from The Christensen Fund. The de Young Global Fellows program invites indigenous artists from around the world to activate the museum as a space where important cultural connections can be forged and historic collections can be enlivened through interactions with the public. The de Young Museum’s Artist-in-Residence program brings working artists into the museum setting, giving the community access to the artistic process. This program enables museum visitors to meet and give artists an opportunity to work with the public. By watching an artist work, talking with an artist, and engaging in art-making activities, visitors learn more about various techniques and processes, thus gaining a greater understanding and appreciation for the art on view at the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco.

Partners Organizations: 

The Luggage Store Gallery: http://www.luggagestoregallery.org

Luggage Store Annex: http://www.luggagestoregallery.org/lsa/

Tenderloin Nation Forest: http://www.luggagestoregallery.org/tnf/

de Young Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco:  www.deyoung.famsf.org/artiststudio

Kua`aina Associates: http://kuaainaassociates.com

 

 

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Kua`aina Associates Presents…the last Visiting Artist of Celebrating Pacific Island Arts Series 2015

Sulu`ape Keone Nunes

 Sulu`ape Keone Nunes photo by Kapulani Landgraf

Sulu`ape Keone Nunes
photo by Kapulani Landgraf

While growing up in the 60ʻs, 70ʻs and 80ʻs Keone Nunes was fortunate to have sat and learned from Kupuna (elders) from his family and the Hawaiian community. Although there were many subjects that were discussed, one that became an important focus was the information shared about Uhi (Hawaiian tattoo). This has been a focus of Keone since the late 1980ʻs. Keone has been doing uhi since 1990 with machines. In 1996 Keone met Suʻa Suluʻape Paulo, originally from Apia, Samoa, but who lived in Auckland, New Zealand, this meeting laid the foundation for Keone to be able to do uhi in the same fashion as was done for over 1,000 years in Polynesia with traditional tools. Keone studied under Suʻa Suluʻape Paulo until his passing in 1999. He has been doing work with traditional Polynesian tools exclusively since 2000.

In 2001 Keone was given the honor of receiving a title from the family of Suʻa Suluʻape Paulo. He was the first Hawaiian to receive the Suluʻape title and among the first non-Samoans to receive this prestigious title.

Keone has been a primary force in the re-establishment of uhi in the Hawaiian community. He has shared his thoughts on designs, techniques, and cultural importance of Hawaiian uhi in Europe, Asia, Polynesia and the Continental United States. He has also given the honor of being named #22 of the 101 Most Influential People in Tattooing in the world by Bob Baxter former editor for Skin and Ink magazine and currently Editor-in-Chief for Tattooroadtrip.com.

Along with his passion for uhi, Keone has also founded Kaʻananiau, a company that is currently contracted by the Administration for Native Americans to provide training and technical assistance to native non-profit organizations in the Pacific region. He is the Project Director for ANAʻs Pacific region training and technical assistance center.

Save the Dates for Keone’s Specail Northern CA Presentations

unnamedOctober 2: E wehe ana i ka maoli (uncovering what is real) – An Evening Celebrating the Artistry of Pacific Island Tattoo“Friday Nights at the deYoung” 

from 5pm – 8:30pm at the deYoung Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco, Golden Gate Park 50 Hagiwara Tea Garden Drive, San Francisco, CA 94118

E wehe ana i ka maoli (uncovering what is real)- Undressing the Savage Lecturer: Sulu`ape Keone Nunes (traditional tattooist)   7:15pm to 8pm, Wilsey Court

A special “Friday Nights at the deYoung” lecture presentation on the practice and tradition of Hawaiian kākau and the revival of tattooing among other indigenous peoples. The evening’s program will also feature local Pacific Island tattoo artists and a fashion show showcasing tattoo designs. This presentations is part of the deYoung’s Public Programs in conjunction with the Royal Hawaiian Featherworks: Na Hulu Ali`i exhibit. 

Specail Guest Tattoo Artists presenting in the deYoung’s Piazzoni Murals Room: Pauhi: Sulu`ape Keone Nunes, Kawika Au, Keli`i Makua; Soul Signature Tattoo: Joel Albanez & CJ Gopez; Humble Beginnings Tattoo: Chris Gonzalas & Melissa Manuel; Kealoha Designs: Andrew Kealoha; and tattoo artists: John Palega and Lomani Gaunavinaka.

— — — — —

October 3: Traditional Hawaiian Kākau (tattoo) & the Revival of California Indian Tattoo Traditions

from 3pm to 5:30pm –  Inter-tribal Friendship House, 523 International Blvd, Oakland, CA 94606

Presenters: Sulu`ape Keone Nunes (traditional tattooist), Artist, L. Frank Manriquez, (Tongva-Achachemen) and special guest. 

A speical community presentation on the traditon of Hawaiian kākau and the revival of California Indian tattoo traditions will be the topic for a cross-culture conversation with the Bar Area Native American community. 

— — — — —

Sulu`ape Keone Nunes will also be visiting with the Indigenous California Indian Communities of Humboldt County in late September. 

For more information on these events please contact kuaaianassociates@gmail.com

Mahalo to following for helping to make CPIA 2015 a big success:

CPIA’s Community Partners: The Oakland Museum of California, Studio Grand in Oakland, the deYoung Museum, California Historical Society PPIE100, East Bay Media Center, Humboldt Foundation/Native Cultures Fund, Alliance for California Traditional Arts, The Warrior Institute, Inter-Tribal Friendship House and Samoan Solutions, Inc.

Celebrating Pacific Island Arts is presented by Kua`aina Associates, an Indigenous Arts and Cultures non-profit based in Berkeley, CA., and made possible by the generous support from the Christensen Fund, Akonadi Foundation 2015 Beloved Community Fund and Private Donors.logoVisit Kua`aina’s website: http://kuaainaassociates.com/Kuaainaassociates.com/Home.html

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Celebrating Pacific Island Arts series 2015

Kahili Pa`a Lima – Hawaiian Hand Held Kahili

With the generous support fromt the Christensen Fund and the Akonadi Foundation 2015 Beloved Community Fund,  Kua`aina was able to host the last workshop of the “Celebrating Pacific Island Arts” series, “Kahili Pa`a Lima – Hawaiian Hand Held Kahili”. Under the teaching and guidance of Kumu Herman Tachera, a group of eager learners spent the day creating their beautiful kahili pa`a lima.

Workshop participants, July 18, 2015 @ Studio Grand in Oakland, CA.

Workshop participants, July 18, 2015 @ Studio Grand in Oakland, CA.

Afforded great respect through the ages, the kahili is a prized cultural item among Native Hawaiian people. Kahili are feathered standards used to show status, lineage, and family ties and are made in many sizes and styles of kahili.

Kahili Pa`a Lima by Hawaiian Feather Artist, Herman Teacher

Kahili Pa`a Lima by Hawaiian Feather Artist, Herman Teacher.  

Hawaiian Feather Artist, Herman Tachera

Hawaiian Feather Artist, Herman Tachera

Herman Tachera is the kumu and founder of Hui Lei Hulu O Ho’omau located in the San Francisco Bay Area.  He has been a Cultural Practitioner of Hawaiian Feather Art for the past 19years.  He was first introduced to the art of lei hulu by Mikioi Iwamoto in 1996 and later fell under the mentorship of Paulette Nohealani Kahalepuna, Mary Louise Kaleonahenahe Kekuewa and Michael Vieira.  Herman acquired his knowledge and experience under the guidance of Aunty Paulette and Aunty Mary Lou assisting them in the teaching of lei hulu, ‘uli’uli and kahili.  In June 2007 Aunty Mary Lou and Aunty Paulette, the foremost masters of Hawaiian Feather Art gave their acknowledge and blessings to Herman to teach and perpetuate the Art of Hawaiian Feathers.  Herman has taught numerous workshops throughout California, Hawaii, Seattle, Portland, Japan and Taiwan.  His most recent lei hulu workshop project of September 2014, was teaching 163 hula students of the prestigious Na Lei Hulu I Ka Wekiu Hula Halau of San Francisco, CA.

Herman Tachera & his Kumu, Master Hawaiian Feather Artist, Paulette Nohealani Kahalepuna

Herman Tachera & his Kumu, Master Hawaiian Feather Artist, Paulette Nohealani Kahalepuna

Herman is dedicated and committed to carry on and ho’omau — perpetuate —                    the teachings of his distinguished and honored Kumu.

Kua`aina Associates would like to say, mahalo nui loa Kumu Herman                                   for sharing your talant and knowledge with us

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Kua`aina Associates Presents . . .

Celebrating Pacific Arts 2015

Celebrating Pacific Island Arts – Workshops & Presentations

Siapo: Interacting with the Past, Present and Possible future of an Ancestral Art Form
Instructor: Regina Meredith-Fitiao
Saturday, June 13, 2015 from 1pm to 7pm

Studio Grand Oakland, 3234 Grand Ave, Oakland, CA 94610

Workshop – Free Registration – Limited Enrollment

Description: Regina will share slides of historical siapo artifacts and the process in the making of a siapo. She will cover the significance of siapo motifs. Engaging the participants in designing a siapo will be the highlight of this workshop. Participants will also be asked to collaborate with Meredith on a siapo mamanu in progress, and work with the authentic materials used for Samoan siapo.

Su’a T. Wilson Fitiao: Laei of Samoa (Samoan Traditional Tattoo)
Presenter: Su`a T. Wilson Fitiao, Tufuga ta Tatau (Samoan Tattoo Master)

Sunday, June 14, 2015 from 1pm to 3pm

East Bay Media Center, 1939 Addison St, Berkeley, CA 94704
Presentation – Free Admission

Description: Su’a will share some of the history, format and legacy of the Samoan traditional tattoo and his journey as a Tufuga ta Tatau.

Yerba Buena Third Thursdays: Laei of Samoa (Samoan Traditional Tattoo) & Siapo: Interacting with the Past, Present and Possible future of an Ancestral Art Form

Presenters: Su`a T. Wilson Fitiao & Regina Meredith-Fitiao

Thursday, June 18, 2015 from 5pm to 8pm

California Historical Society, 678 Mission St, San Francisco, CA
Public Presentation – Free Admission

Description: Presented in partnership with the Yerba Buena Cultural Benefit District. Yerba Buena Third Thursdays is a monthly outing of art, performance, music, and drinks in the Yerba Buena neighborhood in the heart of downtown San Francisco.

Kahili Pa`a Lima – Hawaiian Hand Held Kahili

Instructor: Herman Tachera
Saturday, July 18, 2015 from 1pm to 7pm
Studio Grand Oakland, 3234 Grand Ave, Oakland, CA 94610

Workshop: Free Registration – Limited Enrollment

Description: Afforded great respect through the ages, the kahili is a prized cultural item among Native Hawaiian people. Kahili are feathered standards used to show status, lineage, and family ties. There are many sizes and styles of kahili, and this workshop will provide participants an opportunity to create their own kahili pa`a lima (Hawaiian hand held kahili). The instructor will also lecture on the history of the kahili and its spiritual and cultural importance.

Opening celebration event of the “Royal Hawaiian Featherworks: Na Hulu Ali`i” Exhibit

Presenter: Owana, La’anui and Kalani Salazar
Saturday, August 29, 2015 from 12pm to 4pm
deYoung Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco, Golden Gate Park 50 Hagiwara Tea Garden Drive, San Francisco, CA 94118

Event is free – please check the museum’s website for exhibit admission: https://deyoung.famsf.org/exhibitions/ featherwork

Description: “Celebrating Pacific Island Arts” special musical performance by Owana Ka‘ōhelelani Mahaelani-rose Salazar. Program will include historical and classic songs composed by and for the Ali`i and Mō`ī (Hawaiian Chiefs) and celebrated Hawaiian manu (birds).

E wehe ana i ka maoli (uncovering what is real)- Undressing the Savage
Presenter: Keone Nunes, Kahuna ka kākau (expert tattooist)

Sunday, October 2, 2015 from 6pm to 8:30pm

deYoung Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco, Golden Gate Park 50 Hagiwara Tea Garden Drive, San Francisco, CA 94118
Presentation & Event – Free

Description: A special “Friday Nights at the deYoung” lecture presentation on the practice and tradition of Hawaiian kākau and the revival of tattooing among other indigenous peoples. The evening’s program will also feature local Pacific Island tattoo artists and a fashion show showcasing tattoo designs. This presentations is part of the deYoung’s Public Programs in conjunction with the Royal Hawaiian Featherworks: Na Hulu Ali`i exhibit.

Traditional Hawaiian kākau (tattoo) & the revival of California Indian Tattoo Traditions
Presenters: Keone Nunes, Kahuna ka kākau (expert tattooist) & Artist, L. Frank Manriquez, Tongva- Achachemen

Saturday, October 3, 2015 – from 3pm to 5:30pm
Inter-tribal Friendship House, 523 International Blvd, Oakland, CA 94606

Description: A special community presentation on the tradition of Hawaiian kākau and the revival of California Indian tattoo traditions will be the topic for a cross-culture conversation with the Bay Area Native American community.

Keone Nunes will also be visiting with the Indigenous California Indian Communities of Humboldt County in late September. For more information on scheduled presentations, visit the following link: https://risingindigenousvoices.wordpress.com

Celebrating Pacific Island Arts is presented by Kua`aina Associates, an Indigenous Arts and Cultures non-profit based in Berkeley, CA., and made possible by the generous support from the Christensen Fund, Akonadi Foundation 2015 Beloved Community Fund and Private Donors

CPIA’s Community Partners: The Oakland Museum of California, Studio Grand in Oakland, the deYoung Museum, California Historical Society PPIE100, Hale Naua III, Society of Maoli Arts, East Bay Media Center, Humboldt Foundation/Native Cultures Fund, Alliance for California Traditional Arts, The Warrior Institute and Samoan Solutions, Inc.

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SAVE THE DATE: “Pacific Worlds” exhibit opening May 30, 2015 – January 3, 2016

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Presented by the Oakland Museum of California

“Pacific Worlds” presents Californian identity as tied to and shaped by the histories, peoples, and geography of the Pacific Islands. The Museum’s exceptional Pacific collections have before never been shown on a large scale. Most of the artifacts were collected by an Oakland dentist, John Rabe, who traveled the Pacific in the 1880s and 1890s, doing dentistry and buying and trading dental work for artifacts. Other items were brought to California by naval personnel stationed in the Pacific.

The cultures and peoples featured in the exhibition include those of Tonga, Samoa, Hawai’i, Guam, Fiji, Maori, Palau, and the Caroline Islands. Pacific Worlds focuses on the way historic collections continue to speak to the cultural practices of Pacific Islanders in California today. For example, the Museum’s 25- foot historic outrigger canoe from Manus, Papua New Guinea will be displayed alongside a discussion of contemporary canoe reclamation among many Pacific cultural groups.

The exhibition will explore the Pacific as a region that includes California, focusing on Pacific history, the role of collectors in the region, and the role of Pacific people at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition. The majority of the exhibit focuses the experiences of Pacific Islanders in California and how they maintain cultural practices including dance and music, “foodways,” fiber arts, respect for ancestors, tattooing, surfing, and other practices. Life-sized photographic portraits and biographical profiles of Bay Area Pacific Islanders will help visitors learn more about people and culture.

Pacific Worlds Flyer

http://www.museumca.org/exhibit/pacific-worlds

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Announcing: Two Major San Francisco Bay Area Exhibits opening summer 2015

Kua`aina Associates is proud to announce the opening of two major exhibitions in the San Francisco Bay Area. “Pacific Worlds” at the Oakland Museum of California and “Royal Hawaiian Featherworks: Na Hulu Ali`i” at the deYoung Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco.  For the past year, Kua`aina has been involved with both exhibits that celebrate the cultural heritage of the Pacific Island Peoples. These two exhibits are especially important since California is the home of the largest Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander population outside of their island homes.

PW-tattoo-640x425Community members of Pacific cultures in California will provide strikingly relevant voices and contemporary context to rarely exhibited historical and ritual objects and newly commissioned works of art in Pacific Worlds, a new exhibition at the Oakland Museum of California (OMCA), on view May 30, 2015 through January 14, 2016. Presented to coincide with the celebration of the 100th anniversary of the 1915 Panama- Pacific International Exposition (PPIE) in San Francisco, the exhibition examines the vibrancy and rich cultural practices of the Pacific that continue to thrive in California today.

For more info: http://www.museumca.org/exhibit/pacific-worlds

SAVE the DATE!:

Community Welcome Ceremony– Friday, June 5th (6:00 pm – 7:00 pm followed by Friday Nights Oakland Museum of California featuring performances from Bay Area based Pacific Islanders and visiting Siapo (Tapa) and Tattoo artist from American Samoa.

Royal Hawaiian Featherwork: Nā Hulu Ali‘i

August 29, 2015 – February 28, 2016

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This will be a once in a life time exhibition featuring approximately 75 rare and stunning examples of the finest featherwork capes and cloaks in existence, as well as royal staffs of feathers (kāhili), feather lei (lei hulu manu), helmets (mahiole), feathered god images (akua hulu manu), and related eighteenth- and nineteenth-century paintings and works on paper. This exhibition is organized by the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco and the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum. The exhibit will then travel to the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum for exhibition in 2016.  https://deyoung.famsf.org/exhibitions/featherwork

SAVE THE DATE: Royal Hawaiian Featherwork: Nā Hulu Ali‘i – Community Celebration Exhibit Opening – Saturday, August 29 (time TBD) @ the deYoung, San Francisco.

STAY TUNED!! – UP & COMING ART PACIFIC ISLAND ART SERIES:

Kua`aina Associates will be hosting an Art Series titled, “Celebrating Pacific Island Arts” (CPIA) – scheduled for summer 2015. “CPIA” is a series of workshops and presentations to celebrate the vibrant and rich art practices of Pacific peoples. These series will coincide with the Oakland Museum’s exhibit “Pacific Worlds” and a Native Hawaiian group show curated by “Hale Naua III, Society of Maoli Arts” at Studio Grand in Oakland and the Royal Hawaiian Featherworks: Na Hulu Ali`i exhibit at the deYoung. The art series will be presented by visiting artists from American Samoa and Hawai`i that are cultural practitioners in Samoan Siapo (tapa/kapa making), Hawaiian feather work, music and chant, and Samoan and Hawaiian tattoo traditions.

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Tulafono A Le Agaga E Tu Mau – The Laws of the Spirit Remain the Same

An exhibit of Native Spiritual Art from Around the World

On View through November 29th, 2014  @ The Emerald Tablet in San Francisco, CA

Artist John Rumpley “Forest”

Artist John Rumpley “Forest”

For Immediate Release

November 2014

“Tulafono A Le Agaga E Tu Mau – The Laws of the Spirit Remain the Same” is currently showing at The Emerald Tablet – a creativity salon in San Francisco, California. This group exhibition is the collaborative effort of four San Francisco-based artists who call themselves “The North Star Artists” – Samoan artist Sekio Fuapopo, Finnish American artist John Rampley, Pennsylvania Dutch artist George Shuey, and Filipino-Native American artist George Duran. In the exhibition, the “North Star Artists” present a series of their own artworks along side the works of invited Maori artists Steve Gibbs and Gabrielle Belz, First Nation artists Joe David and Shirod Younker, and Irish American artist Paula Clark.

Each piece in the show traces a specific understanding that each artists has in relationship to the present, the past and genealogy. Through the lens of their cultural identity they uncover imagery, motifs, and colors with the common thread of the “spirit” and “natural” worlds.  This body of work includes abstract and representational paintings along with traditional hand craved canoe paddles and mix media prints.

“The Laws of the Spirit Remain the Same” is a testament that these veteran artists are seemingly immune to the perception and current notion of retirement. Their work definitely is an indication of the powerful inner shift of age and experience that has propelled them into new heights of creativity. In their advanced career as artists, they are highly productive and have produced some of their best work ever – puts a new twist on the phrase “gets better with age”.

“Tulafono A Le Agaga E Tu Mau – The Laws of the Spirit Remain the Same” is a hidden gem that is free for public viewing until November 29

“The Emerald Tablet” in North Beach District

80 Fresno Street, San Francisco, CA 94133   415.500.2323.  

Gallery hours are Wednesday – Saturday 1 – 5pm or by appointment. 

For more information about the “The North Star Artists” visit their website at           http://northstarartists.com

The artists can also be reached at 415.671.0417 or info@northstarartists.com

About the North Star Artists

George Duran 

Born in Stockton, California in 1944, George was influenced by the work ethic of his father, a Filipino farm laborer. Working the fields in Northern California with his father gave hima respect for nature and a love of the land. He was inspired by the stories his mother shared with him about his Shawnee grandmother. “Looking into cultures has influenced my art.” Being a “breed” created an awareness of his dual cultural heritage, and a realization that what is important is the sameness of the spirit. “That is what I try to express in my art. I speak of the spirit and it’s meaning.” “Looking into cultures has influenced my art. I gravitated toward my Indian blood. The imagery of all early cultures is similar, as in Indian, Oceanic, African, and European. All relate to the spirit. What is important is the spirit. That is what we try to express in our art. We all speak of the spirit and it’s meaning.”

Artist George Duran Abstract “City”

Artist George Duran Abstract “City”

Sekio Fuapopo

Born in Utulei, Tutuila, Amerika Samoa in 1947, Sekio was raised and educated in San Francisco. He is influenced by the traditions of the art and culture of his heritage:navigating the seas and humanity by the stars, winds and songs. Sekio’s love of American Jazz continues to inspire his work today. In making his art, his western education is woven with the legacy of the islands.

Artist Sekio Fuapopo “Northern LIghts”

Artist Sekio Fuapopo “Northern LIghts”

John Rampley 

Born in Fresno, California in 1936, John’s bond with the land and nature came from his Finnish grandfather, a farmer and old-world craftsman – a violin maker, musician, master carpenter, metal smith and blacksmith. His move from a small Finnish community to a cosmopolitan San Francisco in 1942 magnified his love of nature. “I draw from the inspiration of the abstract patterns in nature: rocks, snakeskin, and feathers”.

Artist John Rampley “Whale”

Artist John Rampley “Whale”

George Shuey

Born in San Francisco, CA in 1947. “My work seeks to draw extractions from nature, archetypal forms, and symbols. The unknown aspects of our nature can be revealedthrough an inner search for the unknown within ourselves. Automatic writing, form, and marks within the work seek to reveal a greater understanding of nature, ourselves and the universe in which we live.”

Artist George Shuey “Family”

Artist George Shuey “Family”

North Star’s Guest Artists

Gabrielle Belz

Gabrielle is a Maori artist, initially trained as a commercial artist, and is now a full-time painter and printmaker. She continues to support and promote art in the local and widercommunity as current chair of Te Atinga (Committee of Contemporary Māori Visual Arts) of Toi Māori Aotearoa, a founding member of Kauwae (National Māori Women’s Art Collective), trustee of Toi o Manukau, a long-serving member of Nga Puna Waihanga (a national community-oriented organization that supports all Māori arts), a founding member of the artists’ co-operative Pukeko, and she serves on the Creative Community Funds committee for Manukau City.

Gabrielle Belz “Kiwi”

Gabrielle Belz “Kiwi”

Paula Clark 

Paula’s work is influenced by her interested in the natural world internally and externally.Her painting is a reflection of her ongoing exploration of the wonder of the universe and our relationship to it. This consideration of dharma is her lens on cosmic law and order.

Artist Paula Clark “Dharma Dog M”

Artist Paula Clark “Dharma Dog M”

Joe David 

Joe David has effortlessly blended the modern Northwest Coast art movement with hisown Nuu chah-nulth art and other cultural influences. His interest in shamanism, spiritual healing, traditional practices and protecting the environment has become a quest and led him to journey around the world.

Artist Joe David ‘Sea Wolf’

Artist Joe David ‘Sea Wolf’

Steve Gibbs 

A Maori New Zealander, Steve researches mnemonics for his work, exploring the symbolic connections between bird, fish and whakapapa (genealogy), incorporating motifs ofanimals and nature along side those of his Ngai Ngai Tamanuhiri and Tairawhiti hui (tribe). His relationship to the sea is a strong focus and he explores techniques including the use of many translucent layers of paint (up to 70 layers) to represent water and its symbiosis with other elements in his work.

Artst Steve Gibbs “Harakeke Hoe"

Artst Steve Gibbs “Harakeke Hoe”

Shirod Younker

Shirod’s work is always collaboration between the past and present as well as memory of his ancestral homeland. He continues to draw inspiration form the objects his ancestorsleft behind and from the land that he stands on or from the waters he paddles canoe on. Shirod goal is not truly to make the most beautiful object, but an object with a life that facilitates or reminds us to be better people.” Shirod Younker is a member of the Coquille Indian Tribe of Portland, Oregon and an artist specializing in woodcarving and traditional canoe making.

Artist Shirod Younker "Wood Paddles"

Artist Shirod Younker “Wood Paddles”

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Continuing to Follow Paper & Blade: Storytelling Under the Knife de Young Artist Fellows

New Works by de Young artist fellow Adrienne Heloise

photo by Roozbeh Jafarzadeh

photo by Roozbeh Jafarzadeh

Adrienne has been working hard in her studio space in the Kimball Education Gallery. Typically, her work depicts figures from Napoleonic and French Romantic battle scenes. During her first few weeks in the Kimball Gallery, Adrienne  decided to venture out into a new frontier of the American art  – an early American painting from the de Young’s permanent collection, Boatmen on the Missouri  (1846), by George Caleb Bingham.  Through it, Adrienne is exploring her own relationship to early American concepts and her personal resistance to notions of idealized history as she searches for the hidden brutality behind the scenes and questions how iconic imagery contrasts with today’s concepts of patriotism.

Her rendition of Boatmen on the Missouri is a stylized, colorful collage of cut paper on a wooden canvas. The overflow of objects and decorative ornamentation around her central figures reflects themes of excess in early American paintings. She desires a “claustrophobic abundance” to enhance themes of surplus and plenty.

Similar to her other work, her interest stems from her dissection of “masculinity.” The depiction of male bodies representing American “freedom” brings to light how ideas become gendered in the American past. How was the “protestant work ethic” defined by American artists and how was masculinity revealed in this romanticized, glorified genre of painting? Adrienne’s take on the 19th-century painting explores a genre that omits certain truths of American history. However, it is also an exploration of an artist coming to terms with her own identity in the American genre.

– taken from Kelsey Middlebrook, de Young intern

Adrienne working @ Kimball open studio working on "Boatmen" piece.

Adrienne working @ Kimball open studio working on “Boatmen” piece.

Adrienne's rendition of Boatmen on the Missouri is a stylized, colorful collage of cut paper on a wooden canvas.

Adrienne’s rendition of Boatmen on the Missouri is a stylized, colorful collage of cut paper on a wooden canvas.

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