Tulafono A Le Agaga E Tu Mau – The Laws of the Spirit Remain the Same

An exhibit of Native Spiritual Art from Around the World

On View through November 29th, 2014  @ The Emerald Tablet in San Francisco, CA

Artist John Rumpley “Forest”

Artist John Rumpley “Forest”

For Immediate Release

November 2014

“Tulafono A Le Agaga E Tu Mau – The Laws of the Spirit Remain the Same” is currently showing at The Emerald Tablet – a creativity salon in San Francisco, California. This group exhibition is the collaborative effort of four San Francisco-based artists who call themselves “The North Star Artists” – Samoan artist Sekio Fuapopo, Finnish American artist John Rampley, Pennsylvania Dutch artist George Shuey, and Filipino-Native American artist George Duran. In the exhibition, the “North Star Artists” present a series of their own artworks along side the works of invited Maori artists Steve Gibbs and Gabrielle Belz, First Nation artists Joe David and Shirod Younker, and Irish American artist Paula Clark.

Each piece in the show traces a specific understanding that each artists has in relationship to the present, the past and genealogy. Through the lens of their cultural identity they uncover imagery, motifs, and colors with the common thread of the “spirit” and “natural” worlds.  This body of work includes abstract and representational paintings along with traditional hand craved canoe paddles and mix media prints.

“The Laws of the Spirit Remain the Same” is a testament that these veteran artists are seemingly immune to the perception and current notion of retirement. Their work definitely is an indication of the powerful inner shift of age and experience that has propelled them into new heights of creativity. In their advanced career as artists, they are highly productive and have produced some of their best work ever – puts a new twist on the phrase “gets better with age”.

“Tulafono A Le Agaga E Tu Mau – The Laws of the Spirit Remain the Same” is a hidden gem that is free for public viewing until November 29

“The Emerald Tablet” in North Beach District

80 Fresno Street, San Francisco, CA 94133   415.500.2323.  

Gallery hours are Wednesday – Saturday 1 – 5pm or by appointment. 

For more information about the “The North Star Artists” visit their website at           http://northstarartists.com

The artists can also be reached at 415.671.0417 or info@northstarartists.com

About the North Star Artists

George Duran 

Born in Stockton, California in 1944, George was influenced by the work ethic of his father, a Filipino farm laborer. Working the fields in Northern California with his father gave hima respect for nature and a love of the land. He was inspired by the stories his mother shared with him about his Shawnee grandmother. “Looking into cultures has influenced my art.” Being a “breed” created an awareness of his dual cultural heritage, and a realization that what is important is the sameness of the spirit. “That is what I try to express in my art. I speak of the spirit and it’s meaning.” “Looking into cultures has influenced my art. I gravitated toward my Indian blood. The imagery of all early cultures is similar, as in Indian, Oceanic, African, and European. All relate to the spirit. What is important is the spirit. That is what we try to express in our art. We all speak of the spirit and it’s meaning.”

Artist George Duran Abstract “City”

Artist George Duran Abstract “City”

Sekio Fuapopo

Born in Utulei, Tutuila, Amerika Samoa in 1947, Sekio was raised and educated in San Francisco. He is influenced by the traditions of the art and culture of his heritage:navigating the seas and humanity by the stars, winds and songs. Sekio’s love of American Jazz continues to inspire his work today. In making his art, his western education is woven with the legacy of the islands.

Artist Sekio Fuapopo “Northern LIghts”

Artist Sekio Fuapopo “Northern LIghts”

John Rampley 

Born in Fresno, California in 1936, John’s bond with the land and nature came from his Finnish grandfather, a farmer and old-world craftsman – a violin maker, musician, master carpenter, metal smith and blacksmith. His move from a small Finnish community to a cosmopolitan San Francisco in 1942 magnified his love of nature. “I draw from the inspiration of the abstract patterns in nature: rocks, snakeskin, and feathers”.

Artist John Rampley “Whale”

Artist John Rampley “Whale”

George Shuey

Born in San Francisco, CA in 1947. “My work seeks to draw extractions from nature, archetypal forms, and symbols. The unknown aspects of our nature can be revealedthrough an inner search for the unknown within ourselves. Automatic writing, form, and marks within the work seek to reveal a greater understanding of nature, ourselves and the universe in which we live.”

Artist George Shuey “Family”

Artist George Shuey “Family”

North Star’s Guest Artists

Gabrielle Belz

Gabrielle is a Maori artist, initially trained as a commercial artist, and is now a full-time painter and printmaker. She continues to support and promote art in the local and widercommunity as current chair of Te Atinga (Committee of Contemporary Māori Visual Arts) of Toi Māori Aotearoa, a founding member of Kauwae (National Māori Women’s Art Collective), trustee of Toi o Manukau, a long-serving member of Nga Puna Waihanga (a national community-oriented organization that supports all Māori arts), a founding member of the artists’ co-operative Pukeko, and she serves on the Creative Community Funds committee for Manukau City.

Gabrielle Belz “Kiwi”

Gabrielle Belz “Kiwi”

Paula Clark 

Paula’s work is influenced by her interested in the natural world internally and externally.Her painting is a reflection of her ongoing exploration of the wonder of the universe and our relationship to it. This consideration of dharma is her lens on cosmic law and order.

Artist Paula Clark “Dharma Dog M”

Artist Paula Clark “Dharma Dog M”

Joe David 

Joe David has effortlessly blended the modern Northwest Coast art movement with hisown Nuu chah-nulth art and other cultural influences. His interest in shamanism, spiritual healing, traditional practices and protecting the environment has become a quest and led him to journey around the world.

Artist Joe David ‘Sea Wolf’

Artist Joe David ‘Sea Wolf’

Steve Gibbs 

A Maori New Zealander, Steve researches mnemonics for his work, exploring the symbolic connections between bird, fish and whakapapa (genealogy), incorporating motifs ofanimals and nature along side those of his Ngai Ngai Tamanuhiri and Tairawhiti hui (tribe). His relationship to the sea is a strong focus and he explores techniques including the use of many translucent layers of paint (up to 70 layers) to represent water and its symbiosis with other elements in his work.

Artst Steve Gibbs “Harakeke Hoe"

Artst Steve Gibbs “Harakeke Hoe”

Shirod Younker

Shirod’s work is always collaboration between the past and present as well as memory of his ancestral homeland. He continues to draw inspiration form the objects his ancestorsleft behind and from the land that he stands on or from the waters he paddles canoe on. Shirod goal is not truly to make the most beautiful object, but an object with a life that facilitates or reminds us to be better people.” Shirod Younker is a member of the Coquille Indian Tribe of Portland, Oregon and an artist specializing in woodcarving and traditional canoe making.

Artist Shirod Younker "Wood Paddles"

Artist Shirod Younker “Wood Paddles”

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Continuing to Follow Paper & Blade: Storytelling Under the Knife de Young Artist Fellows

New Works by de Young artist fellow Adrienne Heloise

photo by Roozbeh Jafarzadeh

photo by Roozbeh Jafarzadeh

Adrienne has been working hard in her studio space in the Kimball Education Gallery. Typically, her work depicts figures from Napoleonic and French Romantic battle scenes. During her first few weeks in the Kimball Gallery, Adrienne  decided to venture out into a new frontier of the American art  – an early American painting from the de Young’s permanent collection, Boatmen on the Missouri  (1846), by George Caleb Bingham.  Through it, Adrienne is exploring her own relationship to early American concepts and her personal resistance to notions of idealized history as she searches for the hidden brutality behind the scenes and questions how iconic imagery contrasts with today’s concepts of patriotism.

Her rendition of Boatmen on the Missouri is a stylized, colorful collage of cut paper on a wooden canvas. The overflow of objects and decorative ornamentation around her central figures reflects themes of excess in early American paintings. She desires a “claustrophobic abundance” to enhance themes of surplus and plenty.

Similar to her other work, her interest stems from her dissection of “masculinity.” The depiction of male bodies representing American “freedom” brings to light how ideas become gendered in the American past. How was the “protestant work ethic” defined by American artists and how was masculinity revealed in this romanticized, glorified genre of painting? Adrienne’s take on the 19th-century painting explores a genre that omits certain truths of American history. However, it is also an exploration of an artist coming to terms with her own identity in the American genre.

– taken from Kelsey Middlebrook, de Young intern

Adrienne working @ Kimball open studio working on "Boatmen" piece.

Adrienne working @ Kimball open studio working on “Boatmen” piece.

Adrienne's rendition of Boatmen on the Missouri is a stylized, colorful collage of cut paper on a wooden canvas.

Adrienne’s rendition of Boatmen on the Missouri is a stylized, colorful collage of cut paper on a wooden canvas.

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Continuing to Follow Paper & Blade: Storytelling Under the Knife de Young Artist Fellows

In the words of noted artist James Whistler, “An artist is not paid for his labor bur for his vision”
 
Kua`aina Associates would like to give a A BIG SHOUT OUT to these amazing companies: @msc_customs @bldbth @1xrun and @jeegunkim that are product sponsors for “Paper & Blade” artist Ian Kuali’i during his artist residency at the de Young Kimball Gallery. Most important for seeing the value in supporting the art and the artists!
 
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Continuing to Follow Paper & Blade: Storytelling Under the Knife de Young Artist Fellows

2/16/14: Paper & Blade artist fellow Ian Kuali’i’s large cut paper piece is casting its shadow @ the de Young Kimball Gallery!

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de Young Artist Fellows’ 2 month residency
KIMBALL EDUCATION GALLERY @ the de Young
Stop-by and visit the artists!
February 5–March 30 – Wednesdays–Sundays, 1–5 pm
Reception: Friday, March 28, 6–8:30 pm

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Following: Paper & Blade: Storytelling Under the Knife – New Works by Artists Mayumi Hamanaka, Adrienne Heloise, Ian Kuali`i and Kai Margarida-Ramirex de Arellano

Paper & Blade: Storytelling Under the Knife de Young artist fellow Ian Kuali`i today installed his first cut paper piece at the Kimball Gallery. The following photos starts with the final installation of the piece in front of the Kimball Gallery window….followed by photos of Ian’s creation in progress.

Ian’s finished larger scale hand cut paper pieces (12’x8′) is a dedication to is daughter Luna who will be born in San Francisco smack in the middle of his two-month artist residency. (Photos by Ian Kuali`i, Gina Marr & Carolyn Kuali`i)

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Following: Paper & Blade: Storytelling Under the Knife – New Works by Artists Mayumi Hamanaka, Adrienne Heloise, Ian Kuali`i and Kai Margarida-Ramirex de Arellano

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view the video http://instagram.com/p/kXaIXrB4q1/?autoplay=true

Paper & Blade: Storytelling Under the Knife artist fellow Kai Margarida-Ramirez De Arellano video piece…her image transforms into the textile. Kai is working from her Satellite Studio @ Parsons The New School for Design where she is a MFA Fine Arts candidate. Kai will be joining the other de Young artist fellows in the Kimball Gallery late March. 

Artist’s Statement: “My work in the recent years has engaged with these photographs taken by my great-great grandmother. I call this an inter-generational collaboration across the realms. Blowing up the photographs, I can see my ancestors’ faces clearer than ever before. Sometimes they are younger than I am. By cutting into the images, I begin to insert myself into the stories, and I begin to tell a new story that is still in the process of becoming. 

The patterns I cut out of the photographs are sourced from the tile floors in Puerto Rico (which actually are references to the Moorish tiles in Spain) during the 18-and early 1900’s and in my great-grandmother’s house. These tile floors are one of the only shared experiences I have with my mother and grandmother. We all played on those floors, and the patterns were our first encounters with geometry, a sacred and mystical field of epistemology”.

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Paper & Blade WordPress Site Up and Running

Paper & Blade WordPress Site Up and Running

http://www.paperandblade.org/

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